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Course Catalog

Quick Links on this page

Introduction & Work in Progress

Keeping Track of Your Courses

Curriculums

Course Categories

Course Numbering Guidelines

Individual Course Descriptions

Statement of Nondiscrimination

Academic Honesty

Introduction & Work in Progress

This page is designed to help you choose either the Curriculum (Course of Study) or choose which individual courses you need/want to take to meet your personal and professional goals.


A Work in Progress: This page is constantly changing and updating. As laws, training requirements, industry best practices, and research are constantly changing; so is the safety training required. As you stay with Staffingsafety.com, you will notice that we will be constantly adding new courses to meet the changing regulatory climate and at the request of our clients and students.


An downloadable version of this guide is available on the Resources page in case you wish to print a hard copy or refer to it later.


Keeping Track of Your Courses

You need to keep track of which courses you have taken and passed YOURSELF!


Our service is set up, and paid for by the staffing company or general contractor you are associated with. All reports for training are made to the company that is paying for the service. You can consult your employer, staffing company, general contractor, or HR person for additional help.


Simply doing safety training is not enough. OSHA requires a safety program which includes administration. Courses taken, grades, outcomes, etc. are part of the administration and the service that staffingsafety.com's paid service consists of.


You can use our downloadable reporting form from our Resources page to help you keep track of your courses.


Curriculums

Curriculums are the set of courses, and their content, offered by Staffingsafety.com. This is a list of the focused areas of study and the courses needed to complete them. Think of these as "Programs," "Majors" or "Degrees." Below them are the courses required to complete a specific curriculum. It is these curriculums, that when completed, we encourage the employer or staffing company to recognize the students for their accomplishment.




General Industry "10" Safety Training: This program (curriculum) is equivalent to the OSHA 10 hour general industry training. These courses are ideal for supervisors with safety and health responsibilities, and for employee safety and health awareness. Students will be introduced to OSHA policies, procedures and standards as well as general industry safety and health principles covered in OSHA Act Part 1910. Special emphasis will be placed on areas most hazardous using OSHA general industry standards.


  • Introduction Courses
  • INT 101: Introduction to Safety
  • INT 102: Site Safety
  • INT 103: Introduction to OSHA
  • INT 104: Safety and Health Programs
  • INT 122: Hazard Communication
  • INT 123: Lockout Tagout
  • INT 124: Machine Guarding
  • INT 125: Back Safety
  • General Industry Courses
  • GEN 121: Walking & Working Surfaces
  • GEN 122: Means of Egress & Fire Protection
  • GEN 123: Electrical
  • GEN 124: Flammable & Combustible Liquids
  • GEN 125: Bloodborne Pathogens
  • GEN 126: Ergonomics
  • GEN 127: respiratory Protection
  • Driver (Transportation) Courses
  • DOT 101: Seatbelt Safety



Construction "10" Safety Training: This program (curriculum) is equivalent to the OSHA 10 hour training for construction. These courses are ideal for supervisors with safety and health responsibilities, and for employee safety and health awareness. Students will be introduced to OSHA policies, procedures and standards as well as general industry safety and health principles covered in OSHA Act Part 1926. Special emphasis will be placed on areas most hazardous using OSHA general industry standards.


  • Introduction Courses
  • INT 101: Introduction to Safety
  • INT 102: Site Safety
  • INT 103: Introduction to OSHA
  • INT 104: Safety and Health Programs
  • INT 122: Hazard Communication
  • INT 123: Lockout Tagout
  • INT 124: Machine Guarding
  • INT 125: Back Safety
  • Construction Courses
  • CON 121: Electrical
  • CON 122: Means of Egress & Fire Protection
  • CON 123: Electrical
  • CON 124: Flammable & Combustible Liquids
  • CON 125: Bloodborne Pathogens
  • CON 126: Ergonomics
  • CON 127: Respiratory Protection
  • Driver (Transportation) Courses
  • DOT 101: Seatbelt Safety



Transportation "10" Safety Training: This program (curriculum) fulfills the OSHA and DOT training requirements for any employee where driving a vehicle is part of their job. This program (curriculum) would be the equivalent of an OSHA 10 hour course for fleet safety (if OSHA had one). These courses are not only for tractor trailer drivers, delivery vans, but for any employee that drives a vehicle (whether company owned or employee owned) such as outside sales people, taxi cabs, limousines, ambulance companies, etc. Just because you have CDL drivers and a CDL program does not mean that they will not benefit from a different perspective on fleet safety. This program also covers topics that CDL programs do not: slips and falls, and back safety as an example.


  • Introduction Courses
  • INT 101: Introduction to Safety
  • INT 102: Site Safety
  • INT 103: Introduction to OSHA
  • INT 104: Safety and Health Programs
  • INT 122: Hazard Communication
  • INT 123: Lockout Tagout
  • INT 124: Machine Guarding
  • INT 125: Back Safety
  • Transportation Courses
  • DOT 121: Walking & Working Surfaces
  • DOT 122: Means of Egress & Fire Protection
  • DOT 123: Electrical
  • DOT 124: Flammable & Combustible Liquids
  • DOT 125: Bloodborne Pathogens
  • DOT 126: Ergonomics
  • DOT 127: Respiratory Protection


Course Categories

The following table gives a description of the Course Categories to help you better choose which courses you need/want to take to meet your personal and professional goals.


The Course Categories


INT:

The Introductory Safety Courses. These courses create the foundation and introduce you to the concept of safety. These courses are required by everyone taking safety training. Even if you think you know about safety or have had safety training in the past, you still need to take these courses because laws, requirements, and research are constantly changing.

GEN:

The Safety Courses for General Industry. Most of our students will take these courses which cover all industries. Even if you are in an industry that has its own special, more stringent requirements (mining, construction, agriculture, etc.), those industries are subject to the general industry requirements. Training for General Industry provides training for workers on the recognition, avoidance, abatement, and prevention of safety and health hazards in workplaces in general industry.

CON:

Safety Training for the Construction Industry is the next most accessed training, mainly due to the prevalence of construction in our society. Safety Training for Construction provides training for workers on the recognition, avoidance, abatement, and prevention of safety and health hazards in workplaces in the construction industry.
DOT: Safety Training for the Construction Industry is not only for professional truck drivers, but for any employee that operates a vehicle as part of their job. This Category not only covers OSHA and D.O.T. requirements, but also industry best practices. Although you may be a professional driver with years of experience, and have gone through safety training previously, these courses will offer a fresh look and different perspective on Transportation Safety.
PIT: Powered Industrial Trucks, also known as Forklift Training. This category also covers tow motors, yard tractors, powered pallet jacks, order pickers, and more industrial use vehicles. Powered Industrial Trucks is given its own category because of how common they are in industry and construction, and due to the number of employees that use them.
WHS: The Warehousing Category deals specifically with warehousing, shipping, receiving, order picking, packaging, and other aspects safety warehousing safety. These courses begin a more industry focused perspective.

CAL:

California Specific Training is designed to meet the stricter requirements of CAL OSH for both General Industry and Construction preformed in the state of California.

AGR:

Agriculture Specific Training address OSHA's training requirements for workers in the Agriculture Industry. Although most people consider farming to be the Agriculture Industry, nurseries, tree trimmers, lawn maintenance, and many other professions are subject to these regulations.

CHG:

Changes in Training, Changes in Program Requirements is not to be confused with Annual Training Update. Changes in Training, Changes in Program Requirements Courses covers changes that are made to laws, training requirements, and industry best practices. Simply, these are substantial changes made to currently acceptable safety procedures or new areas not previously covered. A good example is the new requirements for residential fall protection.
UPD: Training Updates, Annual Training Updates is not to be confused with Changes in Training. Training Updates are "refreshers" of training that you have previously received on this site or in person from one of our instructors. Updates are usually done on an annual basis and can also include re-taking a course again.
CIS: The Computer Training Category are not solely focused on safety. This Category is more about providing training on the use of specific programs, operating systems, networking, etc. It helps provide employees with skills to be better workers and more desirable in the modern day workforce. While these topics address safety where applicable, Office Safety is addressed in the Introduction and the General Industry Categories and in Office Safety and Ergonomics Courses.
CLI: Client Specific Courses are courses that are requested by or the content is provided by our Clients. Due to the nature of the topics, and to protect the privacy of our clients, many of these courses may have restricted access.
HRM: Human Resources Courses are not solely focused on safety either. This Category is more about providing training and support to the clients and students in the area of Human Resources. Although HR and safety go hand in hand, these courses focus on more of the legal aspects of having employees. They also focus on procedure, administration, and changes in legislation. Many of these courses may have restricted access.

HUP:

Human Performance Courses deal with Behavioral Based Training that protects people and equipment, and ensures continuous quality improvement. Human Performance is similar to Six Sigma, and is found in industries where safety is mission critical. The industries that most often utilize Human Performance include aerospace, defense, oil/gas drilling, petrochemical refinery, and nuclear.

MAR:

Maritime Courses cover the Federal requirements for maritime safety training. This is industry (very) specific training covering jobs that fall under the USL&H Act.

MGT:

Management Courses are not solely focused on safety. This Category is more about providing training and support to the clients and students to be better managers in the workplace. Although management and safety go hand in hand, these courses focus more on the "art" of management and skills associated with management. Skills such as time management, resource planning, work ques, project planning, and employee relations. Many of these courses may have restricted access.
NUC:

Nuclear Courses are designed for employees on work sites subject to NRC regulation. These courses are to be taken in conjunction with Human Performance Courses. These courses include best practices for Human Performance, NRC, DOE, INPO, EPRI, and NISA.

OTH:

The Other Category is for Courses that do not fit in to any other Category.

RSK:

Risk Management Courses look at safety from a "what if" and administrative perspective. As opposed to a hands on approach, Risk Management is on the macro level. These courses help our clients manage risk at the level of the staffing company or general contractor.

SPC:

Industry Specific / Topic Specific Courses cover topics that are focused on one specific industry (not covered elsewhere here) or on a topic that is specific only to certain sites. An industry specific example of this would be logging; while General Industry, Construction, and Agriculture regulations apply, there are additional specific safety requirements for the logging industry. A topic specific example of this would be Cadmium (Cd) training; which would be applicable to employees involved with processes that use Cadmium.


Course Numbering Guidelines

Principles for assigning course numbers: Courses that are labeled as 100, 200, 300, or 400 should reflect the Principles of Bloom's Taxonomy.


The basic idea behind Bloom's Taxonomy is that knowledge and skills build across time. We can consider that the skills and knowledge expected of students in 100-level courses will be lower on the taxonomy scale than what 300/400 levels.


Most institutions separate course work for students into upper and lower division courses. Lower-level (100-200) courses tend to be introductory in nature, either introductions to the major or to the discipline, and broad in their scope (the site of the so-called "survey courses"). Upper-level courses, on the other hand, are the places where the knowledge and skills of students can be deepened, with the higher levels of expertise we come to expect of students who have had wide and deep experiences in their course of study.


The Basic Principles in Bloom's Taxonomy


 KNOWLEDGE
Remember Information

 COMPREHENSION   
Explain the meaning of information

 APPLICATION
Use abstractions in concrete situations

 ANALYSIS
Break down a whole into component parts

 EVALUATION
Make judgments about the merits of ideas, materials, or phenomena




How 100-400 levels can be organized:


 100  Level

Initial immersion in experience with the discipline without expectation of previous exposure

Bloom: Knowledge and Comprehension

 200 Level
Secondary immersion with the discipline to deepen familiarity with more focused study

Bloom: Knowledge, Comprehension, and Application

300 Level

Tertiary immersion, now with special attention to application and analysis within the discipline

Bloom: Knowledge, Comprehension, Application, and analysis

400 Level
Synthetic evaluative experience with the discipline, including disciplinary inquiry and methodology

Bloom: Knowledge, Comprehension, Application, Analysis, and Evaluation


Individual Course Descriptions

Individual Course Descriptions: coming soon.


coming soon

Statement of Nondiscrimination

Staffingsafety.com has a moral and legal obligation to provide equal access and equal opportunity to all members of the community. The administration will ensure that this moral and legal commitment is fully implemented through compliance with relevant federal laws, state statutes, and municipal ordinances prohibiting discrimination.


The institution will implement procedures and measures designed to ensure that students, applicants and employees are not discriminated against on the basis of race, color, sex, sexual orientation, disability, age, veteran status, national origin, religion, marital status, political affiliation, ancestry, union membership, or physical handicap of any individual, or any other protected classification in the administration of its educational programs, activities, admission or employment practices. Any acts of reprisal, retaliation or harassment taken against an individual because he/she has filed a discrimination complaint, testified about matters related to a complaint, or otherwise assisted a complaint inquiry are forbidden and may result in severe disciplinary action.


Inquiries may be directed to the administrator here.

You may also contact us via other methods from our contact page here.

Additional information can be found our Terms of Use.


Academic Honesty

All students have an ethical obligation to adhere to the Honor Code and are required to abide by Academic Honesty Policies. Any student found guilty of academic dishonesty, violations of the Honor Code and Policies is subject to disciplinary action. Violations of the Honor Code and Policies include but are not limited to the following:

  • Cheating - The improper taking or tendering of any information or material which shall be used to determine academic credit.
  • Plagiarism - The attempt to represent the work of another, as it may relate to written or oral works, computer-based work, mode of creative expression (i.e. music, media or the visual arts), as the product of one's own thought, whether the other's work is published or unpublished, or simply the work of a fellow student.
  • Bribery - The offering, giving, receiving, or soliciting of any materials, items or services of value to gain academic advantage for yourself or another. This does not apply to approved or sponsored tutoring or supplemental instruction.
  • Misrepresentation - Any act or omission with intent to deceive an instructor for academic advantage.
  • Conspiracy - The planning or acting with one or more persons to commit any form of academic dishonesty to gain academic advantage for yourself or another.
  • Fabrication - The use of invented or fabricated information, or the falsification of research or other findings with the intent to deceive for academic professional advantage; also the falsification or misrepresentation of experimental data, and violating the professional ethics that are established.
  • Collusion - The act of working with another person on an academic undertaking for which a student is individually responsible. Unless working together on an individual assignment has been prior approved, it is not allowed. On group projects, students must stay within the guidelines set by the instructor.
  • Duplicate Submission - Submission of the same or substantially same paper/project in more than one class unless prior permission has been obtained from the current instructors if the paper/project is being used in two classes in the same term or from the subsequent instructor if being used in a subsequent term.
  • Academic Misconduct - The intentional violation of college policies by tampering with grades or taking part in obtaining or distributing any part of a test, quiz, or graded assignment.
  • Improper course use: Such as having or providing unauthorized outside help when completing online quizzes or assignments or obtaining access to confidential test materials or questions before quizzes or assignments.
  • Impersonation - It is a breach of academic honesty to have someone impersonate one's self in class, in a test or examination, or in connection with any other type of assignment in a course. Both the impersonator and the individual impersonated may be charged.

Additional inquiries may be directed to the administrator here.

You may also contact us via other methods from our contact page here.

Additional information can be found our Terms of Use.